FAQs & Support

Read our frequently asked questions for fast answers.

Questions About Entering Your Profile Numbers

  1. What numbers should I enter in the boxes?
  2. Any tips for filling in my ratings?
  3. How should I rate myself for the time domain fields?
  4. Why do I rate myself on a scale of one to ten, rather than entering my actual numbers (one rep maxes etc.)?
  5. Why do I compare myself to myself, not to other athletes?
  6. Which of the skill based movements should I be entering numbers for? Why do I not enter numbers for every skill?
  7. Why are some of the movements repeated in the skills section?
  8. What if I don't know my results for some of the fields?
  9. How often do I complete the profile?


What numbers should I enter in the boxes?

You should rate yourself on a scale of one to ten. Not compared to other athletes but compared to yourself. You should rate yourself a '10' on your absolute best movements and a '1' on your weakest movement, including movements you can't do. As long as you're consistent across the ratings the system will generate you an accurate profile.

1 if you are unable to do this variable at all. It needs to be a major focus of your training to eradicate your weaknesses.

2-3 if you can complete this variable but it’s one of your glaring weaknesses and is always the limiting factor in workouts. You feel you need to do a lot of this in your training to become more balanced.

4 if this variable is a weakness, though not a major weakness. Sometimes you’re ok at this, but it occasionally lets you down in a workout.

5-6 if you’re ok at this variable. It’s not a major weakness and not a major strength. You can get by in workouts with this variable.

7 if are good at this variable. It’s very nearly a strength and with a small amount of work it could become one of your strengths.

8-9 if you are very good at this variable. You excel when this is in a workout. It’s a major strength and there are only one or two things you can do better.

10 if this variable is your absolute strength. This is what you’re best at.

Any tips for filling in my ratings?

First, read through all the fields so you know what to expect. A coach or a training partner will provide valuable feedback and give you someone to discuss your rating with. You should rate yourself on a scale of one to ten. Not compared to other athletes but compared to yourself. You should rate yourself a '10' on your absolute best movements and a '1' on your weakest movements, particularly movements you can't do. Everything else should be relatively evenly spread between these numbers. An absolute beginner should have just as many 10's as a season athlete. You should regularly compare movements to help you fill in accurate numbers. For example, if you scored yourself a '9' on a deadlift and your back squat is more of a strength than your deadlift, then your back squat needs to be ranked a '10'. Once you've filled out all the fields, it's a good idea to go through them again and make sure you're happy with them. Compare fields with the same score and see whether you are happy with them being given the same rating.

How should I rate myself for the time domain fields?

There are four different time domains given and you need to rate them using the same system as you've rated all your other measures. For example, would you be better at a one rep max deadlift or a 6-10 minute conditioning session? Imagine a workout where you are not limited by how heavy a weight is or how many bodyweight movements you have to do, but are purely limited by your cardiorespiratory endurance. Rating yourself for a workout with light, low skill movements like burpees, wall ball, kettlebell swings, running, rowing etc work well. The best way to rate these fields is to work out which times domain you would be best and worst at then make sure the others lie between them.

Why do I rate myself on a scale of one to ten, rather than entering my actual numbers (one rep maxes etc.)?

We need to be able to compare exercises and movements of different types. Real values would mean we couldn't compare a one rep max deadlift with five minutes of max reps pull-ups. Rating yourself on a scale of one to ten (particularly with the assistance of a coach or training partner) allows us to accurately compare your proficiency in various movements, skills and time domains.

Why do I compare myself to myself, not to other athletes?

As this program aims to correct individual imbalance, there is no requirement to compare to others. The aim is to create a more balanced athlete, eradicating weakness. As these weaknesses are eradicated, not only does the athlete become more balanced, but the overall 'sum' of their fitness increases. The balance of an athlete is dependant on individual performance, not on the performance of others.

Which of the skill based movements should I be entering numbers for? Why do I not enter numbers for every skill?

You need to enter numbers for the skills that are appropriate to your level. This ensures that you can master the basic skills before moving on to more advanced skills. Beginner athletes should enter numbers only for beginner skills, intermediate athletes should enter numbers for both intermediate and beginner skills, and advanced athletes should enter numbers for all skills. This ensures you will learn to walk before you learn to run.

Why are some of the movements repeated in the skills section?

In the skills section, we're looking to measure how skilled and efficient you are at a movement. You may give yourself a low rating for five minutes max pull-ups because your stamina with pull-ups is poor, but a high rating for kipping pull-ups because your kip is very effective and efficient.

What if I don't know my results for some of the fields?

If you are a beginner athlete, you may not have attempted some of the movements. If it's a movement you know you would not be able to do, score a '1'. If it's a movement you think you could probably do, score a '2' or '3'. For some of the fields you may never have done the exact variable stated but will have a good idea of how your performance would rate. For example, you may never have done 20 rep maxes for the powerlifting movements, but the profile is actually asking you how your performance in these movements would be rated for higher reps. A coach will help you to determine scores for any fields you struggle with.

How often do I complete the profile?

My Fitness File will prompt you to reprofile every 12 weeks (or 24 sessions if you're a lower volume user). Reprofiling happens at the end of your testing.

Support Hours

We're happy to answer any questions you have. Just drop us a note and we'll get right back to you. We're around Monday through Friday between 9am - 5pm AWST (minus the occasional national holiday).

Shoot an email over to support@myfitnessfile.com. Also, we're very active on our Facebook page so you can catch us there.